John McCain Planning on Killing Tax Reform

Here we go again. John McCain is apparently working hard on cementing his legacy as President Trump’s chief obstructionist.

It’s no wonder that McCain is now more popular with Democrats than Republicans.

As reported in the Hill, Forty-four percent of Republicans surveyed in the Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll released Wednesday hold a negative view of McCain, while only 35 percent have a positive view of him.

Meanwhile, 52 percent of Democrats surveyed now see him in a positive light.

As reported in  Zero Hedge

It’s official: The Republican tax reform bill is dead on arrival in the Senate now that John McCain has become the third Republican senator to confirm that he plans to vote against it.

What’s worse for the Trump administration, McCain reportedly wants the bill to receive input from both parties – a criticism that he cited as his reason for voting against the Trump administration’s plan to repeal and replace Obamacare. This is particularly problematic because there’s approximately zero chance that any Democratic lawmakers will break ranks to vote with Republicans, despite President Donald Trump repeatedly saying that he expects to win over Democrats.

McCain reportedly confirmed his opposition – and also that the bill in its current form is DOA – during an interview with Fox Business’s Charlie Gasparino.

In recent weeks, John McCain has reiterated his demand that Republicans pass their tax plan through a bipartisan process that honors the norms of regular order. McCain voted down his party’s Obamacare repeal bill precisely because it failed to meet this standard. And it will be impossible to pass the House plan – or anything close to it – through any but a rushed, secretive, partisan process.

On Monday, Susan Collins declared her opposition to repealing the tax on multimillion-dollar estates. The current bill includes such a repeal, and many House conservatives seem deeply attached to the provision for some mysterious reason. And for months now, Bob Corker has also insisted that he wouldn’t vote for any tax plan that adds even a penny to the debt, even during the first ten years, where Congress would legally be allowed to do so. As it stands, the House plan would increase the deficit by a total of $1.5 trillion over ten years.

You can read more here.